Nevada Division of Environmental Protection approves Jerritt Canyon Mine’s plan to restart milling operations

March 25, 2009
Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Logo

CARSON CITY, Nev. – The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) has announced the completion of initial environmental compliance requirements at Queenstake Resources’ Jerritt Canyon Mine, a major producer of gold in northern Elko County. This determination will allow Jerritt Canyon Mine’s milling and ore processing operations to restart.

“Queenstake Resources has met all requirements to restart. There are requirements to continue operation and we’ll be working with Queenstake to ensure those are met in the near future,” said NDEP Administrator Leo Drozdoff.

The NDEP has worked with mine personnel continuously during the past six months. Air and water issues have been resolved to a level that will allow Jerritt Canyon Mine to begin processing ore. The restart will allow Queenstake Resources to rehire workers, generate revenue and continue required environmental work at the site. Read the rest of this entry »

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Public Hearing on CO2 Emissions Set for March 25

February 12, 2009

Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Logo

White Pine Energy Center Power Plant
Public Hearing on CO2 Emissions Set for March 25

CARSON CITY, Nev. — The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), Bureau of Air Pollution Control, will conduct a public hearing on Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Ely, Nevada, following an agency determination on CO2 “Greenhouse Gas” Emissions.

The hearing is scheduled for 6 p.m. at the Bristlecone Convention Center, Bristlecone Room, 150 Sixth Street, Ely, Nevada.

LS Power intends to move forward with this project. However, in light of an Environmental Appeals Board (EAB) ruling on CO2 emissions, NDEP is inviting the public to comment on the agency’s determination. Public comment has already been closed on our technical review of the White Pine Energy Center and at this time we are limiting public comment solely to the agency’s determination on CO2 as it relates to the Clean Air Act. The Agency position remains the same that there are currently no federal or state clean air standards or regulations that govern carbon dioxide emissions or other greenhouse gas emissions for power plants.

Since NDEP’s original determination there have been a number of actions, including the EAB ruling regarding Deseret Power that reaffirms our position that greenhouse gases are not subject to state or federal air quality standards. However, NDEP is presenting the basis for our determination to the public through this public hearing.

According to Michael Elges, bureau chief for Air Pollution Control, “We understand this is an ever evolving issue. LS Power has elected to move forward with their project, in response to that action NDEP prepared an agency determination pursuant to greenhouse gases. And we are accepting comments solely on our determination.” Read the rest of this entry »


Two-Day Burn Project in Little Valley

January 9, 2009
Nevada Division of Forestry winter fuels treatment project in the Sierras.

Nevada Division of Forestry winter fuels treatment project in the Sierras.

Click here for a slideshow.

During a two-day burn in Little Valley, just west of Washoe Valley, the Nevada Division of Forestry conducted a controlled burn of wood piles from previously thinned forest lands. The NDF helicopter inserted two 12 person crews one day and 130 piles were burned. On day two the helicopter inserted three 12 person crews and 250 piles were burned. A total of 380 piles burned, an effort which helps enhance forest health in the Sierras.


Arborist training offered in Reno January 13-15

January 6, 2009

Nevada Division of Forestry LogoRENO, Nev. — The Nevada Shade Tree Council, the Nevada Division of Forestry and the City of Reno are sponsoring an arborist training series to improve tree care skills and prepare those interested in taking the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) Certified Arborist Examination.

The series is in three 8-hour sessions, January 13-15, 2009, and will be held at the City of Reno Horsemen’s Park at 2800 Pioneer Road in Reno. The $75.00 registration fee and application are due no later than January, 8.

A registration form can be downloaded at www.forestry.nv.gov or by request to the Nevada Division of Forestry at 775-684-2506.

An ISA Certified Arborist Examination will be held on February 17 with the Nevada Landscape Association Conference. Contact ISA at www.isa-arbor.com for information on the exam.


Cooperating across state lines to protect Tahoe

December 15, 2008

Lake Tahoe Nevada State ParkBackyard conservation can have far-reaching effects, as homeowners in two states of the Lake Tahoe Basin learn from cooperating conservation districts

(Article courtesy of the National Association of Conservation Districts’ report, Our Land, Our Water.)

Cooperation across state lines between two conservation districts is helping residents in the Lake Tahoe basin protect one of America’s best-known water bodies.

Lodged in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Lake Tahoe was developed rapidly and not always wisely in the mid-20th century. With multiple jurisdictions in the basin, including two states, cooperation is the key to making conservation gains.

The Tahoe Resource Conservation District in California and the Nevada Tahoe Conservation District in Nevada have the daunting task of helping about 40,000 residential property owners in the basin comply with mandated best management practices (BMP). Their work is part of a broader strategy to reduce sediment and nutrient impacts on water quality in Lake Tahoe and improve overall forest resource management. Read the rest of this entry »


Tackling Noxious Weeds a Watershed at a Time

December 4, 2008

 

The Mason and Smith Valley conservation districts in Nevada participated with partners in a Streambank Soil Bioengineering Technical Training Workshop. The site was experiencing drastic bank erosion. Partners in the workshop included the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Western Nevada Resource Conservation and Development, the Natural Resources Conservation Service and Nevada Division of Water Resources. Workshop participants reshaped the stream bank, installed rock refusal trenches, rock and vegetated barbs, willow bundles, juniper revetments, live stakes and erosion control blankets.

The Mason and Smith Valley conservation districts in Nevada participated in a Streambank Soil Bioengineering Technical Training Workshop. The site was experiencing drastic bank erosion.

Controlling noxious weeds requires watershed approaches and strong partnerships. Two conservation districts have joined forces with local, state and federal partners to get the work done.

(Images and article courtesy of the National Association of Conservation Districts’ report, Our Land, Our Water.)

Gaining a foothold in efforts to eradicate noxious weeds is like herding cats. They’re not always where you want them to be.

That’s one of the lessons learned by partners in noxious weed control on the Walker River basin in western Nevada. But the weeds may be corralled by a project that focuses on pinpointing where they are and then eradicating them a watershed at a time. The first step is developing a comprehensive map.

“We’ve known for some time that a comprehensive map is not available,” says Michelle Langsdorf, district manager of the Mason Valley and Smith Valley conservation districts. The districts chair the Walker River Basin Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA), comprised of landowners and local, state and federal agencies. “All the stake-holders in the basin got together to find those gray areas where noxious weeds aren’t targeted or funding is not available. Those are the areas where weeds thrive most,” she says.

The partners decided to coordinate efforts to have a greater impact. The conservation districts have a central role. The partners decided to address weeds on a watershed basin. The Walker River has east and west branches that join into a main stem. Each of the stems has a reservoir that serves agricultural producers who grow alfalfa, garlic and onion and graze cattle and sheep. Read the rest of this entry »


Mountain pine beetles up the threat to region’s forests and urban trees

November 24, 2008
Gail Durham, Nevada Division of Forestry, shows bark beetle damage on a pine tree.   

Gail Durham, Nevada Division of Forestry, shows bark beetle damage on a pine tree.

 
Forestry officials recommend steps for storing firewood in order to avoid infestations

View a slideshow here.

CARSON CITY, Nev. – Sierra Nevada forests are approaching what could become an epidemic of pine beetle infestations. Swaths of forests in the Western U.S. and Canada have been decimated by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), and Nevada officials are seeing more trees this year killed by the beetles in Sierra forests.

“After two years of drought, mountain pine beetles and pine engraver (Ips pini) beetles have been found in the dense stands of lodgepole pines in the Mount Rose area west of Reno,” said Pete Anderson, state forester with the Nevada Division of Forestry. “Both of these species can attack pine trees in urban areas.” Read the rest of this entry »